вторник, 8 июня 2010 г.

F# Performance of events (update)

There is another solution to the challenge we’ve met last time. In my previous post I’ve skipped it because it is F# specific and result cannot be used directly in other languages. However after discussion with ControlFlow I think this solution is also worth mentioning.

As you remember the problem was inability to call Invoke method of the delegate. Using statically resolved type parameters and member constraints we can make compiler do all the job for ensuring that type has method Invoke with particular signature and calling it properly.

type MCEvent< ^D, ^A when ^D :> Delegate and ^D : delegate< ^A, unit> and ^D : (member Invoke : obj * ^A -> unit) and ^D : null>() = 
[<DefaultValue>]
val mutable multicast : ^D

member inline this.Trigger(sender : obj, arg : ^A) =
match this.multicast with
| null -> ()
| d -> (^D : (member Invoke : obj * ^A -> unit)(this.multicast, sender, arg))

member inline this.Publish =
{ new IDelegateEvent< ^D> with
member x.AddHandler(d) =
this.multicast <- System.Delegate.Combine(this.multicast, d) :?> ^D
member x.RemoveHandler(d) =
this.multicast <- System.Delegate.Remove(this.multicast, d) :?> ^D }

//test helper
type MCEventClass(num) =
let event = new MCEvent<EventHandler<EventArgs>, _>()

[<CLIEvent>]
member this.Event = event.Publish

member this.Run () =
for i in 1 .. num do
event.Trigger(this, new System.EventArgs())


Test class is appeared to be almost the same as ones we’ve used in previous post. However if you open compiled assembly with Reflector you’ll see the difference

// FsFastEventClass
public void Run()
{
int i = 1;
int num = this.num;
if (num >= i)
{
do
{
this.@event.Trigger(this, EventArgs.Empty);
i++;
}
while (i != (num + 1));
}
}

// MCEventClass
public void Run()
{
int i = 1;
int num = this.num;
if (num >= i)
{
do
{
MCEvent<EventHandler<EventArgs>, EventArgs> event2 = this.@event;
object sender = this;
EventArgs e = new EventArgs();
if (event2.multicast != null)
{
event2.multicast(sender, e);
}
i++;
}
while (i != (num + 1));
}
}

As you see compiler have inlined code of Trigger method inside Run  and accessed field multicast directly. That’s why we replaced let binding with val.

namespace Benchmark
{
class Program
{
const int Iters = 1000000;

static void Run(string caption, Action action)
{
Console.WriteLine("{0} started", caption);
var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
action();
sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("{0}:{1}", caption, sw.Elapsed);
}


static void Main(string[] args)
{
Run("F# events", RunFSEventTest);
Run("Fast events", RunFastEventTest);

// initial pass to trigger generation of invoker (so generation time is not included in tests)
RunEventV2Test(1);
Run("Precomputed events", () => RunEventV2Test(Iters));
Run("MemberConstrainedEvents", RunMemberConstrainedEventTest);
}

private static void RunFSEventTest()
{
var fs = new Events.FsEventClass(Iters);
int fsCalled = 0;
fs.Event += (s, a) => fsCalled++;
fs.Run();
}

private static void RunFastEventTest()
{
var fs = new Events.FsFastEventClass(Iters);
int fsCalled = 0;
fs.Event += (s, a) => fsCalled++;
fs.Run();
}

private static void RunEventV2Test(int n)
{
var fs = new Events.GenFastEventClass(n);
int fsCalled = 0;
fs.Event += (s, a) => fsCalled++;
fs.Run();
}
private static void RunMemberConstrainedEventTest()
{
var fs = new Events.MCEventClass(Iters);
int fsCalled = 0;
fs.Event += (s, a) => fsCalled++;
fs.Run();
}

/*
F# events started
F# events:00:00:8.8833742
Fast events started
Fast events:00:00:00.0300628
Precomputed events started
Precomputed events:00:00:00.876707
MemberConstrainedEvents started
MemberConstrainedEvents:00:00:00.0251707
*/
}
}

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